Tampons were packed with their strings connecting them, like a strip of sausages, so they wouldn’t float away. Engineers asked Ride, “Is 100 the right number?” She would be in space for a week. “That would not be the right number,” she told them. At every turn, her difference was made clear to her. When it was announced Ride had been named to a space flight mission, her shuttle commander, Bob Crippen, who became a lifelong friend and colleague, introduced her as “undoubtedly the prettiest member of the crew.” At another press event, a reporter asked Ride how she would react to a problem on the shuttle: “Do you weep?”

Astronaut Sally Ride and the Burden of Being “The First” (via yahighway)

Men don’t appreciate the amount of self-control women have to exercise in order not to spend their entire lives facepalming.

(via vulvanity)

(Source: dinosaurparty)

Word cloud of contributions to ‘Queer and There’, special issue of the Assuming Gender journal co-edited by me and Dr David Andrew Griffiths. The issue is available free and fully open-access here and includes an editorial on which David and I collaborated, and my interview with zero-g artist Frank Pietronigro. Also, articles about queer domestic space, Strictly Ballroom, Caine Prize-winning African literature, and book reviews on W. G. Sebald and genetic science.

Word cloud of contributions to ‘Queer and There’, special issue of the Assuming Gender journal co-edited by me and Dr David Andrew Griffiths. The issue is available free and fully open-access here and includes an editorial on which David and I collaborated, and my interview with zero-g artist Frank Pietronigro. Also, articles about queer domestic space, Strictly Ballroom, Caine Prize-winning African literature, and book reviews on W. G. Sebald and genetic science.

The question of direct sexual release on a long-duration space mission must be considered. Practical considerations (such as weight and expense) preclude men taking their wives on the first space flights. It is possible that a woman, qualified from a scientific viewpoint, might be persuaded to donate her time and energies for the sake of improving crew morale; however, such a situation might create interpersonal tensions far more dynamic than the sexual tensions it would release. Other means of sexual release (masturbation, homosexuality) would be discouraged because of the confined quarters and the lack of privacy on such a mission.

Nick A. Kanas and William E. Federson, ‘BEHAVIORAL, PSYCHIATRIC, AND SOCIOLOGICAL PROBLEMS OF LONG-DURATION SPACE MISSIONS’, NASA 1971, p. 38.